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Vol. 2. No. r. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1902. 



Price, 5 Cents. 



The Central Heating Plant. 

The editors, thinking- that some statement 
and description of the central heating plant 
which is being added to Wellesley's equip- 
ment, would he of interest to both the 
alumnfe, who are not here, and the under- 
graduates, who are, have gathered some in- 
formation concerning the matter, for publi- 
cation in College News. 

To begin with, the following statement of 
the financial situation has been very kindly 
made for us by President Hazard : 

"Ever since the beginning of President 
Hazard's administration she has felt the im- 
portance of the establishment of a central 
heating plant. In each of her unnual re- 
ports attention was called to this. Last 
year Mr. Rockefeller offered to install a 
plant at a cost not to exceed .?150,000, pro- 
vided a like sum was raised at commence- 
ment time, 1902. The President was loth 
to call upon alumnas, who had done so much 
for the College so recently. She therefore 
found it exceedingly difficult to meet the 
conditions in time, and had abandoned the 
scheme of having the plant begun in 1902, 
when Mr. Rockefeller, deeply impressed 
with the importance of the saving to the 
College (for it is estimated it will save 
about §10,000 a year in running expenses) 
offered to begin the installation of the plant 
on the assurance that one-half the amount 
was pledged, and to extend the time until 
commencement, 190.3. This is the situation 
at present ; there remains to be raised the 
sum of $75,000 and to seciire the actual pay- 
ment by commencement day, 1903, of the 
whole of the $150,000, which will go toward 
the epdownient of the College. This the 
, President and Trustees have pledged their 
best efforts to secure. As a matter of fact, 
$26,.501 have been paid in — the one dollar 
being the spontaneous gift of an alumna of 
the College, who asked to have it placed to 
the credit of the endowment fund. The 
matter is one of urgency, as the time before 
commencement is not very long, and the 
President is busying herself to secure these 
funds." 

Meanwhile the work on the plant is pro- 
gressing rapidly. When we came back to 
College in September, we found the grounds 



in a state well calculated to humble our per- 
haps excessive pride in their beauty. The 
beginnings of the power-house could be seen 
in the hollow usually known as the "Gravel 
Flats," down back of the Chemistry Build- 
ing ; and from there radiated in all direc- 
tions long lines of unsightly ditches, whose 
borders were garnished with mortar boxes, 
piles of bricks and boards and old barrels. 
One ditch ran diagonally through the lawn 
in front of the Shakespeare House, crossing 
the road Once about half-way up the hill to 
College Hall, and again just beyond the 
curve at the top, then on past the dining- 
room windows, and so to the extreme west 
end of the building. Another, beginning 
also at the site of the power-house, went 
around the base of the hill, past the Art 
Building, the Tan Zeta Epsilon House, and 
thence aeross the road and up the hill to 
Stone Hall. A third connected this main 
line with Music Hall, going directly past the 
west door of the chapel. These three were 
the most noticeable. We rejoice to say 
that they are now almost entirely filled up, 
and the contractors have promised that by 
Thanksgiving the grounds will at least be 
"whole," though not entirely clean. 

The laying of the conduit along the side 
of the hill was a particularly difficult piece 
of engineering, owing to the lowness of the 
ground. This difficulty has been overcome 
by raising the conduit above the ground 
level ; and in order to avoid the unsiglitly, 
curved rise which this would make if left 
uncovered, the direction of the road is to be 
changed slightly, and carried farther up on 
the side of the hill. This will make the 
road cover the " excresence " entirely, and 
the rhododendron bed on the other side 
will be extended over the ground where the 
road is now. 

The heating is to be by steam, and the 
fixtures already in the buildings are to he 
used without change. The possible loss of 
heat in the long distances to be traversed 
between buildings, has been guarded against 
by the particularly careful structure of the 
conduits. These have a cement bottom, 
and are surrounded by double brick walls, 
between which there is an air-chamber — an 
extremely poor conductor of heat. 

The only building needed by the plant is 



the central power-house, which is to be of 
red brick, and as inconspicuous as possible. 
The necessarily tall chimney is to have as 
graceful a shajje as circumstances will per- 
mit. 

While we all regret the necessity of having 
our beautiful grounds torn up, and carefully 
keep away all relatives and friends who 
have never seen Wellesley, we realize at the 
same time the great benefit which this im- 
provement will bring us, and are willing to 
put up with the unpleasantness for the sake 
of the good to come. Nor must we forget 
the great thought and care which President 
Hazard and the Trustees have given to mak- 
ing the process and the result as little ob- 
jectionable as possible to the grounds. They 
have used every possible expedient to keep 
these as beautiful as before, and our warm- 
est thanks are due to them for their thought- 
fulness, when we consider how much worse 
it might have been without that thoughful- 
ness. 



The Sophomore Reception, 

One of the i^leasantest parties in years 
was the Sophomore Reception given Satur- 
day night. The Barn looked its best, deco- 
rated profusely with green things and with 
many "specially imported" electric lights. 
Near the door was a flower-laden table from 
which each guest received, on entering, 
a bunch of pansies, the Sophomore flower. 
Another variation from the usual order of 
things was the absence of dancing, that 
element which has always been the bane of 
every girl at these receptions ; the commit- 
tee had arranged for promenades instead, 
and all found it a comfortable innovation. 
The night was sufficiently pleasant to allow 
the guests to walk outside under the full 
moon. Indeed every feature of the recep- 
tion contributed measurably to the enjoy- 
ment of all present. 

Besides the Faculty guests there were 
some three hundred Freshmen, the hostesses 
numbering about two hundred. Those who 
received were Dean Pendleton, Miss Poyn- 
ter. Sophomore President, and Miss Nelson, 
Vice-President. President Hazard and Mrs. 
Durant, who had also expected to receive, 
were prevented from coming. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College IRews. 



Press of N. a. Lindsey & Co., Boston. 



Published weekly by the editors of the Wellesley 
Alagazine. 

Subscription price, 75 cents a year to resident 
subscribers; Sl.OO per year to non-resident sub- 
scribers. 

All business correspondence should be ad- 
dressed to C. W. Rogers, Business Editor College 
News, Wellesley, Mass. 



EolTOR-rN-CHIEF. HELENE LOUISE BUHLERT, 1903 

Business Manager, Carrie M. Holt, 1903 



The editor, looking up from a tUiok pile 
of short stories, the accumulated spoil of 
several English courses during the past 
three years, wipes away her tears, and sends 
forth from her inmost heart a plea. For 
weeks she has been reading tales of every 
sort of human sorrow ; blighted affection, 
grinding poverty, sin, shame, sickness, lin- 
gering and sudden death, morbid introspec- 
tion, insanity, suicide — is it any wonder she 
weeps ? It must be a result of the great 
law of contrast, that some hundreds of hap- 
py girls should choose only ghastly subjects 
for their stories ; it certainly is easier to 
work up an atmosphere of patlios than any 
other kind. But please let us write some- 
times about the peojile who many and live 
happily for ever after ! We do not want 
nonsense tales, as a rule, but we do want 
sane, healthy, happy stories which shall 
contradict the modern tendency toward the 
morbid and sad in our magazine literature. 
There are occasional instances where pathos 
is a fine and necessary element of a story — 
but all its effectiveness is lost if we have 
nothing else. At present it is almost ira- 
jiossible to find a modei'ately cheerful story 
for the Wellesley Magazine. Hence the tear- 
ful plea of the editor, who expects to be- 
come a victim of melancholia unless she is 
given something hapiiy to read ! 



The ever-greedy Magazine Board is all 
ways calling for " more," and this time 
it is nonsense rhymes for the funny 
column, which, by the way, is still unchris- 



We are 
showing a 
fine line 
of 




(Classes 



Chafing 
Dishes 



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It is a fact that our Glasses combine 
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PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS, 

288 Boylston Sti-eet, Boston. 



tened. ( It is not well for a child to go many 
weeks unnamed ! ) Now we know that 
Wellesley girls can write good nonsense 
rhymes from the experiment of the Maga- 
zine in 1901 — and here is a golden opportun- 
ity for more. We don't want to copy non- 
sense verses from other college papers ; we 
are just as clever as they, and we want to 
write our own ! It is fun to write them and 
fun to read them. Every other apiieal that 
the editors have made has met with a prompt 
and loyal response, and this has given us 
confidence to make tliis one. Let the result 
show tliat our confidence is not misplaced. 

Golf Tournament. 

A handicap tournament for IS holes was 
held on the Wellesley Golf Club course on 
November 10, for a cup offered by Mr. Benj. 
H. Sanborn, President of the Chib. The cup 
was won by Miss L. A. McDonald, 1904, 
with a net score of 90. It. is to be noted 
that in this tournament Miss Marie L. Ab- 
bott made a score of 43 on her second, thus 
lowering by one stroke her previous record, 
which was the lowest for women on this 
course. 

The entries from the college were as follows: 
gross score haudica]! net 

L. A. McDonald 114 IS lir. 

Marie L. Abbott 97 scratch '.17 

Hilda Weber 107 S 99 

Miss Kalberine Edwards 10.5 4 lill 

Helen Edwards 108 102 

Ethel McTaggart 124 VI 112 

Margaret Stevens.. .. i;30 IS 1!2 



Shepard, Norwell Co. 



Have a Special Depart- 
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just as you enter the 
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SHEPARD, NORWELL GO. 



Hair Bows Dress Corsages 

MISS ANNA C. NELLIGEN, 
IVI illinery Parlors, 

Room s, 37 to 41 Temple Place, Boston 

IS PER CENT. DISCOUNT to Students and the 
Faculty of Dana Hall and Wellesley College. 



HALL & HANCOCK. 

WOMEN'S 
Hatters and Furriers, 

.Sole Boston Agents for 

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407 Washington Street, Boston. 

Latest Design 

Wellesley College 

Seal Fob Charms, 

Sterling Silver in Gray and Rose Finish 

" J. H. Washburn Co. •'^^^^^p'^fcrANs. 

41 Main ,St., 0pp. Depot, Natick. 



Wellesley Steam Laundry, 

BLOSSOM STREET. 

All kinds of fancy ironing at reasonable 
prices, f'ollections made Monday and Tues- 
day ; deU\'cries, Thursday and Saturday. 



The D. S. HcDonald Co. 



131 Xremont Street. 



Our New Dining Room Now Open. 




COLLEGE NEWS 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 



Tuesday, Kovember 11, 7.30, P. M., meeting of the Debating Club 
in College Hall chapel. Meeting of Science Club in Physics Lecture 
Koom. 

Wednesday, >N^ovember 12, 4.1.5, P.M., 1904 class meeting in Lec- 
ture Room 3. 

Thursday, Jfovember 13, 4.15, P.M., 1905 class meeting in Lecture 
Eoom 1. 

Saturday, J^ovember 15, the Sophomore reception. 

Sunday, November 16, services in Houghton Memorial chapel, 
sermon by Kev. Harris C-J. Hale of Brookline. 7, P. M., vesper serv- 
ice. Address by Miss Mabel Clair Curtis, under the auspices of the 
College Settlement Association. 

Monday, November 17, 7.30, P. M., lecture in College Hall chapel 
by Miss Fannie Edgar Thomas, on " French Composers at Home." 

Thursday, November 20. 7.30, P. M., regular meeting of the Chris- 
tian Association. 

Saturday, November 22, 3.20, P.M., Miss Helen G. Eager will 
address students who expect to teach or seek other employment after 
leaving college. 

7.30, P.M., Barnswallows. The members of the Glee Club give 
the operetta " Love and Whist." 

Sunday, November 23. Services in Houghton Memorial Chapel. 
Sermon by President Faimce of Brown University. 

7, P.M., vespers, with special music. 



COLLEGE NOTES. 



THE SCEIBBLEES' CLUB. 

The .Scribblers' Club this year consists of Misses Allen, Baker, 
Buhlert, Conover, Holt, Lord, Schopperle, 1003; Sybil Baker, More, 
Huntington, Natalie Smith, 1904; Haulenbeck, Tatuui, Waxham, 
1905; Miss Bixby, 190(), 

Miss More and Miss Huntiugton entertained the Club at the Phi 
Sigma house. Saturday, November 15. Miss Sybil Baker read a 
story. All were present save the Sophomore and Freshmen mem- 
bers, who were at the reception. 

THE SOUTHERN CLUB. 

On Thursday evening, November 13, Miss .Jenkins and Miss Terry 
entertained the Southern Club at Wood Cottage. Miss Moffatt, a 
member of the club, was present, and introduced Miss .Johnson of 
Cornell University. Tlie latter spoke about the work now being done 
for higher education in the far south. It is her earnest wish 
and that of all who are interested in the south, that a college for 
women should be established there, as there is at present no college 
for women — in the strict sense of the word — south of Baltimore. 



At a regular meeting of the Debating Club, held in College Hall 
Chapel, Tuesday night, the plans for the year were discussed, and 
the following officers elected: Chairman for the year, Miss Elizabeth 
Taylor, 1904; Secretary and Treasurer, Miss Dixon, 1903. 

THE FACULTY SCIENCE CLUB. 
The monthly meeting of the Faculty Science Club occurred on 
Tuesday evening. Professor Bragg gave a paper on the Liquefaction 
of Gases with a summary of recent work on the properties of matter 
near the absolute zero of temperature. Miss Grace Davis spoke of 
" Becquerel Fiadiations," illustrating by lantern slides, and experi- 
ments showing the jiroperties of Kathode rays, and S rays, which 
led to the discovery of radio-active substances. The portrait of Mme. 
Curie, whose work has made large contributions to this subject was 
shown. 

Miss Wright, the head of the Physical Training Department at 
Radcliffe, will hold a special drill on Monday, November 24, at 11, 
A.M., in the Radcliffe Gymnasium. She has invited all Wellesley 
students who are interested in the work to come and look on. 



Miss Elizabeth Campbell held an exhibition of burnt wood articles 
in Eoom 47, College Hall, on Wednesday, November 12. Some of 
the pieces were very beautiful. 



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Including LIGHT and HEAVY SHOES 
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Prices $3.5o to $6.oo. 
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WBITING PAPERS. 

STAMPING AND ENGRAVING. BLANK BOOKS OP EVERT KIND. 

MILLINGRY, 

iZEILINGS, 

NE CKDRESS. 

We exchange goods if not perfectly satisfactory. 

Special Discounts to Students of Wellesley College. 

HEADDRESSER, 

NECKDRESSER, 

Boston, Mass. 



/V\nne. Gookin 

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Our Complete Fall and Winter Stock Now Ready. 
We call special attention to a Large Assortment of Dresses made in our own workrooms for School and 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



COLLEGE NOTES; 



NOTICE TO VILLAGE STUDENTS. 

Village students will from now on iind their copies of the Maga- 
zine placed on the table in the Village Eooni, instead of near the 
book-store, as formerly. Some copies of the November Magazine 
still remain, unclaimed, in the Village Room. 



Miss G-race Dean was elected from the class of 1903 as member of 
the Executive Board of The Student Government Association. She 
takes Miss Stockwell's place on the Board. 

Miss Florence Piper, ex-1903, visited Miss Lukens at Wilder Hall 
last week. 

Miss Udetta D. Brown, 1903, returned on the 13th from New York, 
where she had been for the past week. 

Miss Gertrude Knight, 190-5, spent a few days last week at her 
home in Buffalo. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Kelly of Germantown, Pa., visited their 
daughter, Miss Jeannette Kelly, 1904, last week. 

Miss Maud Jessup, 1904, has gone home on account of her mother's 
illness. 

Miss Lucia Proctor, 1903, has been obliged, on account of ill 
health, to leave college. The class feels deeply this loss, which 
comes so soon after Miss Stockwell's departure. 

Miss Elizabeth Campbell, 1902, left for her home in Philadelphia, 
Thursday, November 13, after a long visit in TVellesley. 

Janetta G. McGregor, 190.5, will not return to college this year on 
account of the death of her brother. 

Miss Elizabeth Campbell, 1902, entertained the debate team of 
last spring at the Alpha Kappa Chi rooms on Monday night, Novem- 
ber 10. A very entertaining game was the diversion of the day, and 
the guests. Misses Lord, Mills, Warren, Hunter, Dixon and Conover, 
pronounced ihe second reunion a delightful one. 

Miss Emily Mills entertained the same group of girls on Wednes- 
day evening, at College Hall. The prize was then given to the girl 
who worked out in clay the most lively and significant model of 
something connected with the Vassar debate. With this gay party, 
a kind of farewell to Miss Campbell, the series of reunions closed. 



FREE PRESS. 

I. 

A .Junior told me, the other day, that since she had been at college 
she had read nothing not required in her academic work. This is 
the text of my sermon. If she has not yet learned a wise distribu- 
tion of time, so that she can never employ her individual taste in 
such a pre-eminent matter as reading, college is not for her. Study 
is not the chief end, even for girls who must also " do " athletics 
and committee meetings. If one has not time, when she has ex- 
cluded fudge parties and aimless conversations after ten o'clock, to 
accomplish all importunate tasks, to read a reasonable amount at her 
own pleasure to maintain a moderate correspondence, and to take long 
walks alone, it is her academic work that should suffer, for the 
destruction of private life is the death-blow to individuality, and the 
girl who prostrates herself utterly before the idol of her college work, 
is blotting out her personality. This molding into the mass is what 
follows from absolute devotion to any one occupation — we all know 
it in the day-laborer. Attention and time are needed to retain the 
original integrity of self, but its retention is far more worth while a 
purpose than the search for academic perfection or even the accom- 
plishment of executive work. There are many, many who need no 
admonition on this subject. Their time is entirely consecrated to the 
joy of self-hood. But the over-conscientious ones needs a reminder 
of the time due to self, and its ultimate value. We need a little 
time for ourselves, that the originality we lack so distressfully may 
take care itself. A. B. 

WELLESLEY INN. 

Those who wish to engage room and board at the Wellesley Inn for 
a part or all of the Christmas recess should apply at once to The 
Wellesley Inn, Wellesley, Mass. 

RIDIIVQ HABITS 

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Special Offer, $6.50. 

As an introduction to the entering class I make the following offer ; 
1 dozen Platinum Photographs, regular price, $3. -in 
1 dozen 6x8 College Views, unmounted, 3 60 

1 7x10 flexible leaf Album, 1.00 

Total, SS.IO 
Bring your photographs, etchings, etc., uuframed and have them 
framed \>y me and save the cost of expressage and possible damage to 
glass, etc' 

KODAK DEVELOPtNG AND PRINTING. PORTRAITS, FRAMING. PASSEPARTOUTS - 

ABEUU, Photogfaphei-, Wellesley. 



G. U. 



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LeBasche, LADIES' HATTER, 

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Discount to Wellesley Students and Faculty. 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



FREE PRESS— Continued. 

II. 

The problem of what to do with handkerchiefs in tliese days of 
pocket-less gowns, becomes serious; but there is one solution of it 
against which a protest should be made. A damp wad sometimes 
finds its way into the right hand of its owner, with the result that 
two fingers are offered in greeting or gratitude by tlie entering or re- 
tiring guest, the other two being fully occupied by securing that 
elusive bit of cambric. Our grandmothers would simply have 
looked at a hand so offered, until the offender became conscious of 
her rudeness. Why do we shake hands at all? Is it not first and fore- 
most a sign of our common humanity, a recognition of our mutual 
interest and concern for each other? This must be the fundamen- 
tal idea. Horses rub noses; we shake hands. Coldness and anti- 
pathy unconsciously find their way into the perfunctory hand shake 
and varying degrees of cordiality, respect and affection are expressed 
in it. Simplicity must lie at the root of all good manners. How can 
we be simple if we allow a flimsy bit of materialism to interfere in 
the expression of our true feeling? I have seen a young woman 
deeply conscious of the gratitude she owed a distinguished person 
for words which had reached her very soul. Naturally she was too 
shy to say so, and how was he ever to have any intimation of her 
true feeling, when on being presented she offered him two fingers? 
Shift the handkerchief; drop it; step on it; do anything with it, 
rather than allow that consequential bitof cambric to imagine itself 
so important as to secure more attention from its owner than the per- 
son she greets. A Senior. 

III. 

We all know and all lament the crowded condition of our library; 
we all wish ardently and loudlv that we were rich enough to present 
the college with a fine, large, light, airy library building. I admire 
this view, this potential generosity, but since we are not any of us 
rich enough to present the college witli a new library building, I 
would suggest that we turn our energies in another direction and de- 
vote ourselves to making the most of our present accommodations. I 
recognize that it is practically impossible to keep the library quiet for 
the ten minutes between periods, and that considerable walking 
about is necessary all the time, but continued whispering is seldom 
necessary, and giggling is never necessary at all. There is notliing 
essentially funny about the library and the student most lacking in 
self control need have but little difficulty in restraining her mirth, if 
she will not use the library as a room for social meetings. 

There are many of us who have to use the library constantly and 
who cannot so concentrate our attention on our books as to be oblivi- 
ous to loud whispering and laughing directly behind or beside us. I 
know that girls have often taken two hours to accomplish work that 
they could easily have accomplished in one hour, had the library been 
comparatively quiet. Let us all consider how much a little noise on 
our own part may disturb our busy neighbor, and try to be more 
quiet in the library. 1903. 

IV. 

I do not speak with the authority of Ruth Ashmore, yet it seems 
to me that there is an element of rudeness in the attitude of the 
Wellesley girls toward receptions. One might think that a reception 
was an affair for which many invitations were issued, but to which 
no guests were expected to come — or an opportunity for certain 
people to talk at length with guests of honor, while waiting for 
college friends to appear. This rudeness comes from a conceited 
quality in us all I think, — for if we were not well-satisfied with our 
Wellesley friends, would not more of us seek the inspiration which is 
offered us in the opportunity to meet artists, litterateurs, and workers 
from the field of action we hope soon to enter? Do let's have our 
Faculty and Students' Parlours crowded on reception nights. We are 
throwing away good opportunities when we miss knowing the great 
men and women who come to us. B. 

V. 

May a member of 190i make a suggestion to the girls who study in 
College Hall chapel? Students are asked to use the chapel for study 
during the crowded hours in the library, if the chapel is not in use as 
a class room. On the chapel door is a schedule giving tlie hours 
when the chapel is put to such use. Will the girls please be more 
careful to see whether the room is in use before opening the door? It 
is rather annoying to lose an important statement of instructor or 
student because the door is being noisily opened and closed. 

Jewelry for Young Ladies, 

DRESS-OUTING-BUSINESS. 

Prizes for All Games. Gifts for Every Occasion. 

U/rist Ba(js, poeKet Books, Card C^ajes, Opera 
Qlasses, Umbrellas, persoi^al (;,ard apd C^lass 
Eo(jrauio<J. . . ..... 

Inducements are Quality, Style, Price. 




m/dtt&^^^^ 



24 Winter Street, 
Boston. 



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Special attention is given in our Shirt Waist Dept. 
on the third floor to making order Shirt Waists. 
When goods are provided in wool, French flannel 
or cotton (not silk) we take special measurements 
and charge for the making, lined or unlined 

Perfect fit and satisfaction guaranteed. 



GILCHRIST COINIPANY, 

Winter and Washington Sts., Boston, Mass. 

William Leavens & Co, 

FURNITURE 
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32 Canal Street, 



Boston, 



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Makers and Finders of the Unusual. 



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Central Location 



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boston, mass. 

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COLLEGE NEWS 



gL^yfgl^Y Theatrical Wigs and Make-up, 
226 Tremont Street, Boston. 

Near Touraine, 0pp. Majestic Theatre. 
CURLS, SWITCHES, POMPADOURS TO ORDER. 



IowMeVs 



CHOCOLATES 
SO and 60c per lb. 



DELICIOUS-DAINTY— PURE. 
4I6 Washington St., ( 4th door North of Summer St. ) 



Established 187.5. 

Chas. E. Shattuck, 
GROCER, 



Edward E. Henry, D.M.D. 

(Grad. Harvard Univ, Dental School) 

Shattuck's Block, . Wellesley. 
Hours 9-13 and 3-5' 

Dr. fT\. 0. f/elsoi^, 

D e NT I ST 

I^oom 4, U/aleott BuildiQcJ, 

INatick, iVlass. 

MARY L. MORAN, 
DressmaHii}?, 

Shaw Building, Wellesley, Mass. 
latest pasl^ioQS, 

GEO. P. RAYMOND CO. 
Costume •• Parlors, 

17 Boylston Place, Boston 

Costumes tor private theatricals 
and Costume parties. 

John A. Morgan 8t Co. 

PHARMACISTS, 

Shattuck Building, Wellesley, Mass- 

"Tom" Griffin "'*°^'' st., 

lUIII VJIIIIIII, WELLESLEY 

Carriages at Station on arrival of all trains. 

Reliable Horses and Carriages To Let. 

Personal Attention to all orders 
for eveninj;^ trains. Order box at 
North Door of College Hall. 

BAGGAGE TH..1KSFERRED. 

TELEPHONE 101 -6. 



The Still Unchristened Column. 



SCENE, LIBRARY.— Enquiring Freshman to Studious Senior. 
"Can you tell me where to Hnd " Passeiu- ? It's the last book on 
the Literature list, and I've looked on the reserve shelves, and even 
through the catalogue, and I can't iind it anywhere ! " 

Junior: "Such luck— I wanted to cut this period, but did not 
have a decent excuse until just before the bell when my back devel- 
oped the queerest little pain." 

Senior : "Ah, I see, a stitch in time — " 



Considering the recent runs of Duse and Mrs. Campbell, isn't it 
nice to have in prospect a morality play in Boston? 

UNHAPPY SUSAN. 
Susan, sitting in the sun, 
Was playing with a loaded gun ; 

Her father, who just happened by. 

Received the buckshot in his eye. 

But Susan cried, her heart was broke, 

'Cause papa couldn't see the joke. 

— Co h(in h ia Jester. 



The following list of bill.s paid by an English town in the ancient 
days of Miracle Plays, was no doubt a matter of course to the people 
of that time, but to us it seems decidedly funny: 

Pd. to Eauston for cock crowing, 3d, 

Pd. for mending Hell, 2d, 

Pd. for painting of Hell mouth, 3d, 

Pd. for setting the World on fire, .5d. 

We are glad to notice that this last item is considered of the most 
importance, but still we think that a remuneration of five pence for 
setting the world on fire is entirely inadequate. 

Fkau Ecke. (recently from Berlin, who is viewing the grounds) 
to her niece — "My dear, can you show me the new heating plant that 
has been planted here ? I have heard you speaking of it. Is it the 
large pine tree we passed a moment ago? " 



The Wellesley Calendar. 

As usual there will appear shortly before Christmas, a Wellesley 
calendar, which will appeal with especial force to every stuilent here. 
It will contain artistic photographs of college buildings and interest- 
ing spots about the campus, of crews, athletic teams, and so forth — 
everything that a stuilent at Wellesley this year will want to hold in 
her memory after she leaves. The cover for the 1003 calendar is to 
be a great variation from that used heretofore, of novel and elabnr- 
ate design, and while adding very much to the beauty aiul desirabili- 
ty of the book, will not increase its price. It will be on sale early in 
December, at the price of $1.00. 



B. HURWITCH, 

Ladies' Tailor and 
Fashionable Dressmaker, 

134 Castle Street, Boston 

HOLDEN'S STUDIO, 

20 No. Ave., Natick, 

HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS. 

Connected by Teleplione. 

R. M. PORTER, 

Plumber. 

TIN AND SHEET IRON WORK 

Hot Water and Steam Heaters. 

Dealer in Stoves, Ranges, Hardware, 

Paints, Oils, Etc. 

Wellesley, IVlass. 

We have done College 

Work for IS years 

People's Steam Laundry, 

F. L. CUPPLES, Prop. 

F. A. Coolidge & Co., 

Dealers in 

Choice Meats and Provisions. 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

J. TAILBY & SON. 
FLORISTS, 

Wellesley, Opp. R. R. Station 

Orders by mail or otherwise 
promptly attended to. Con- 
nected by Telephone. 

Clelan^ S. XIlnber\voo5, 

NATICK, MASS. 

Special " Biff Value " Morris CluiirB, 
$5.00; Tea Tables, Fancy Screens, 
Scrap Baskets, Couch Covers, Jar- 
dinieres, Jardiniere Stands. 

Our teams deliver free. 



WHY ! VVomen should investigate and study the advantages of 

Investment Insurance. 

ABSOLUTE SecURlTV «or money invested. 
o •! cc EQUAL AOVANTAOeS in investment of either 

because it OrierS 'arge or small amounts. 

OPPORTUNITY to ADAPT investment to changing 
conditions of life. 

HELEN M. FOQLER, 



Penn Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



ORGANIZED 1647. 



Special Representative, 
31 Milk Street, 

Boston, Mass. 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume 

Chartered 11102. 
COTRELL a LEONARD, Albany, N. Y. 

Makers of the Caps, Gowns and 

Hoods to the American Colleges 

and Universities. 

Illustrated Bulletins, Samples, Blanks, etc., on application 

Annie 'W. Stocking, (Wellesley '02) in charge of correspondence, may 
be addressed as above. 

WELLESLEY AND OTHER HOODS. 

B. A $3.50 to $ «..';0; desirable, $ 5.50 

M. A., .... 6.75 " 16.50; " 10.50 

Ph. D. .... 8.50 " 22.00; " 13.50 




COLLEGE NEWS 



ALUMNA NOTES. 



The alumna? and former students of Wellesley College are asked, 
when visiting the college, to register in the general office immediate- 
ly after arrival. This registration will facilitate the delivery of 
letters, telegrams and telephone messages, and will be of service to 
college friends. 

Miss Elizabeth Stark, '9.5, is teaching in the preparatory depart- 
ment of the Colorado Springs College. 

iliss Mary Goldthwait, '97, is teaching English in Miss Guild's 
School in Boston. 

Annie Fuller Babcock, '02, is teaching English and History in 
Mrs. Potter-Bailey's Home School, Everett, Mass. 

Miss Lucy J. Freeman, '97, sailed on the Cambroman on Novem- 
ber 8, for Naples. 

Miss May Mathews, 1902, has been appointed Resident Head 
Worker at the new Social Settlement, 226 Degrau St., Brooklyn, 
N. T. 

Miss Wells, '98, Miss Taylor, '95, Miss Seelman, '98, and Miss 
Mills, '01 spent six weeks of their vacation in study at the summer 
school of Cornell University. 

Miss Ethel Bowman, '00, starts this week for Texas, where she 
will be the guest of Mary Davis, '01. Miss Bowman will stop with 
college friends in St. Louis and Chicago on her return. 

Miss Florence Painter, '97, is now at Wellesley doing some 
tutoring work in the English Department. 

Miss Sara A. Emerson, formerly instructor in Wellesley College, 
is continuing her study of Biblical Literature at Yale University. 

The New York Wellesley Club held its first meeting for the year, 
at 30 West 57th street. The President, Miss Dora Merrill, presented 
as the guest of the afternoon Miss Josephine Dodge Daskam, who 
read some of her poems. The meeting was a propitious opening for 
the year. 

ENGAGEMENTS. 



The engagement is annoimced of Miss Grace Watson Sutherland, 
'99, to Mr. Gardner Cottrell Leonard of Albany, N.Y. 

The engagement has just been announced of Miss Pearl Living- 
ston Underwood, Wellesley, 93-95, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Livingston Underwood, to the Rev. .John Hopkins Denison. 

Mr.Denison has accepted a call to the Central Church in Boston. 

The engagement is announced of Miss Bertha Palmer, '91, to Mr. 
Lane, Librarian of Harvard University. 

MARRIAGES. 



Smith — Wilcox. — On .June 25, 1902, at Medford, Massachusetts, 
William Grant Smith and Martha Chapin Wilcox, '95. Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith will be at home this winter at 710 North Fortieth street, 
Omaha, Nebraska. 

Wall— SwEETZER. — On Wednesday, October 29, 1902, Miss 
Mabel Persis Wall, '97, was married to Mr. Ij. Wallace Sweetser. 



BIRTHS. 



October 13, 1902, at Omaha, Nebraska, a son, William Mayse 
Christy, to Mrs. Elizabeth Mayse Christy, '92. 

October 26, 1902, at Greenwich, New York, a son, to Mrs. Annie 
Louise Boies Sharp, '85. 

October 29, 1902, at Baltimore, Maryland, a daughter, Elizabeth 
Powell Ranck, to Mrs. .Judith Blackburn Ranck, '97. 

November 6, 1902, a son, Woodbury Dana Swan, to Mrs. Hannah 
Dana Swan, '97. 



This space reserved for Wright & Ditson, 
dealers in Athletic Goods, 344 Washington 
Street, Boston. 



Send for Catalogue of Field Hockey Goods. 



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BOSTON TO LIVERPOOL(via Queenstown 
Sailing from Boston on Wednesdays. 

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Boston to GIBRALTAR, NAPLES, GENOA 
and ALEXANDRIA, via AZORES, Sailing on 
Saturdays. For further information call on or 
address 

RICHARDS, MILLS & CO., 
77-81 STATE STREET. BOSTON. 



HOTEL TOURAINE, Boylston and Tremont Sts. 
PARKER HOUSE, School and Tremont Sts. 
YOUNG'S HOTEL. Court Street. 

/ J. R. WHIPPLE & CO., BOSTON. 

A. SHUMAN & CO., Boston 

Ladies' Suits made by Men Tailors, Ladies' Coats, Ladies' 
Waists. Ladies" Negligee Gowns and Sacques, Ladies' Un- 
derwear, Ladies' Hosiery, Ladies' Shoes, Ladies' Gloves, 
Ladies' Complete Outfits. ... ... 

Shuman Corner, Washington and Summer Streets. 

LrUINCMEOIV. 

Nelson L. Martin OAK GROVE CREAMERY CO. 

445 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

Everything we serve in our Diiiiig Room is the claoicest and best 
that can tie bought, regardless of price. 

The Bet^kelcy Hotel, 

Berkeley and Boylston Streets. 
iVl o d e r n in Every Detail. 

Restaurant for Ladies. Entrance on Boylston Street, 
JOHN A. SHERLOCK. 

MISS STASIA ENRIGHT, 

Manicuring, Shampooing, Artistic Hair Dressing. 

Dealer in Hair Goods and Toilet Articles, Facial Treatments. 

MATiCEL WAVE A SPECIALTY. 

2A. Pat-lv Stt-eet, Room 3, Boston. 



D. COOK & CO. 
ECATERERS.i 



AVON STREET, - BOSTON. 

Teas and Spreads. 



RAYMOND BABBEB, 


PICTURES FRAMED 


All the Pruits 


— AT— 


In Their Season. 


Mrs. H. E. Curriers' 


Washinston St., Wellesley. 


Grove Street, Wellesley. 



John H. Pray & Sons Co. 

FINE CARPETINGS, 
ORIENTAL and 
DOMESTIC RUGS, 
UPHOLSTERY GOODS. 

Pray Biailding, Boston 

646 Washington Street, opposite Boylston. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY NOTES. 



A program meeting of Zeta Alpha was held in the Zeta Alpha 
house, October 25. The program for the evening was: 

The Political Situation of Russia Florence Van Wagenen 

The Life of Tolstoi Edith Clifford 

The Philosophical and Social Theories of Tolstoi Mary FoUett 

Anna Karenina Anna Darby 

A program meeting of Tau Zeta Epsilon was held in the T. Z. E. 
house, October 27. The program was as follows : 

Music Margaret B. Little 

Outline of Tear's Work . Marion E. Fenton 

Bulletin Board Notes Gertrude Schopperle 

Facts on the Life of Velasquez Etta Armstrong 

Picture, Velasquez's Portrait of Himself Florence Noera 

At a program meeting of Alpha Kappa Chi, November 1, the fol- 
lowing papers were read: 

Stage Setting of the Greek Drama.. Grace Edwards 

Euripides Marion Potter 

Euripides "Alcestis" Alice Baker 

At a regular meeting of the Shakespeare Society, held on 
Saturday evening, November S, the following program was pre- 
sented : 

Paper, A.ct I, of " The Taming of the Shrew '' Helene Buhlert 

Dramatic Representation, "The Taming of the Shrew" Act II. 

Baptista Helen Norton 

Petruchio Carolyn Nelson 

Hortensio Ida Ellison 

Tranio Crete Kimball 

Gremio Sarah Woodward 

Bianca Edith Moore 

Katherina Elizabeth Marston 

Servant J ulia Holder 

At this meeting, Mary Beltzhoover Jenkins, 1903, Helen Cook, 
1905, and Emma Miller, 1905, were initiated into membership in the 
society. 

Wednesday evening, November 12th, The Zeta Alpha Society 
initiated Mary Little, 1903, and Jessie Marvin, 1904. 

At a birthday party of The Agora, Friday evening, November 14th, 
Helen Fitch, 1903, was initiated. 



Musical and Theatrical Notes. 



CoLONi.vL THK.iTiiE: Mrs. Patrick Campbell will play '•The 
Second Mrs. Tanqueray " Weilnesday and Tluirsday night, Novem- 
ber 19 and November 20. "Aunt Jeannie " Friday, ( November 21 ) 
night; "Magda" Saturday matinee ( November 22 ), and "The Joy 
of Living" Saturday night. Francis Wilson in "The Toreador" 
follows Mrs. Campbell. 

Tremont Tiieatke ; E. S. Willard plays ■' Tom Pinch " Wednesday 
night and Saturday matinee; "The Middleman" Thursday, Friday 
and Saturday night. Tne week of November 24, he will play " All 
for Her." 
Hoi.lis-Street Tiie.\tre: " The Rogers Brothers at Harvard." 
Boston Museu.m: Clyde Fitch's play, " A Bird in the Cage." 
BosTox TiiKATiiE: The comic opera, "When Johnny Comes 
Marching Home." 

A troupe of Burmese football players and jugglers will be the lead- 
ing novelty at Keith's next week. Papinta, the dancer, is still 
there. 



Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

Fifth Rehearsal and Concert, 
Friday afternoon, November 21, at 2.30 o'clock. Saturday evening, 
November 12, at 8.00 oclock. 

Programme. 

Mendelssolm Symphony in A major ( Scotch ) 

Marschner Aria from " Hans Heiling" 

Dvorak Variations 

Wagner, "Wotan's Farewell" and "Fire-charm," from "Die Walkiire" 
Soloist, Mr. Anton Von Rooy. 



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Price, $225 Cash. 

Agencies and music libraries in all principal cities. 

SEND FOR CATALOG 



THEODORE P. BROWN, 3 May St,, Worcester, Mass. 

WALTER J. BATES CO.. 123 Boylston Street, 

LOCAL REPRliSENTATIVE. 



E . T. SLATTERY CO. 

SCHOOL SUITS 

Made of SPECIAL NEW ENGLISH and SCOTCH SIIXTURES, JACKETS SILK LINED, 

Prices $27.50 to $4S.OO 

FALL WAISTS 

Made of IMPORTED FLANNELS and COTTONS at very moderate prices. 
STYLISH OUTING HATS, FURS AND N E C K \A/' E A R . 

lO per cent. Discount to Welleslej' Collese students. 155 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON.